DEATH OF AFFECT

Real Time Review

Development: Alaska Projects Sydney

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Development Material

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“ The ambiguous role of the car crash needs no elaboration – apart from our own deaths, the car crash is probably the most dramatic event in our lives, and in many cases the two will coincide. Aside from the fact that we generally own or are at the controls of the crashing vehicle, the car crash differs from other disasters in that it involves the most powerfully advertised commercial product of this century, an iconic entity that combines the elements of speed, power, dream and freedom within a highly stylised format that defuses any fears we may have of the inherent dangers of these violent and unstable machines.” – J G Ballard Crash

“We declare that the splendor of the world has been enriched by a new beauty: the beauty of autonomy. Each to her own rhythm; nobody must be constrained to march on a uniform pace. Cars have lost their allure of rarity and above all they can no longer perform the task they were conceived for: speed has slowed down. Cars are immobile like stupid slumbering tortoises in the city traffic. Only slowness is fast” – Frank Bifos 2009 Post Futurist Manifesto: 4

“the notion of a “Scientific Revolution” in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries is part of a larger mainstream narrative of Western culture that has propelled science, tech- nology, and capitalism’s efforts to “master” nature—a narrative into which most Western- ers have unconsciously been socialized and within which we ourselves have become actors in a storyline of upward progress. Demoting the “Scientific Revolution” to the mere nomer of “early modern science” obscures the power of the dominant narratives of colonialism and imperialism that have helped to shape Western culture since the seventeenth century at the expense of nature, women, minorities, and indigenous peoples. This move hides the political power of scientific narratives in remaking the earth and its natural resources as objects for human use.14″ The Scientific Revolution and The Death of Nature  By Carolyn Merchant 

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